Indice del forum

apicoltura
Indice del forum

discussioni di apicoltura

PortalPortale  blogBlog  AlbumAlbum  Gruppi utentiGruppi utenti  Lista degli utentiLista degli utenti  GBGuestbook  Pannello UtentePannello Utente  RegistratiRegistrati 
 FlashChatFlashChat  FAQFAQ  CercaCerca  Messaggi PrivatiMessaggi Privati  StatisticheStatistiche  LinksLinks  LoginLogin 
 CalendarioCalendario  DownloadsDownloads  Commenti karmaCommenti karma  TopListTopList  Topics recentiTopics recenti  Vota ForumVota Forum


Produrre api tolleranti alla varroa
Utenti che stanno guardando questo topic:0 Registrati,0 Nascosti e 0 Ospiti
Utenti registrati: Nessuno

Vai a pagina Precedente  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Successivo
 
Nuovo Topic   Rispondi    Indice del forum -> Avversità delle api
PrecedenteInvia Email a un amico.Utenti che hanno visualizzato questo argomentoSalva questo topic come file txtVersione stampabileMessaggi PrivatiSuccessivo
Autore Messaggio
il moltiplicatore






Sesso: Sesso:Maschio
Età: 56
Registrato: 23/04/12 19:40
Messaggi: 1778
il moltiplicatore is offline 

Località: Diano Marina (IM)
Interessi: Piante da frutta sub-tropicali, api




italy
MessaggioInviato: Ven Ott 18, 2013 1:49 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

Questa è una parte dell' ultima mail dell' AIAAR, al posto degli asterischi e dei puntini manca la parola adulto in inglese
Ciao
Alessandro


Presidente Gabriele Milli
Fr Rofelle 62 - 52032 Badia Tedalda AR cell. 338 7054382
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!



*)Api e varroa.
Daniele Greco ha messo a disposizione della nostra ml il materiale che segue, assieme ad altro che useremo in una prossima uscita. Daniele ci avverte da quando ho fatto questa piccola ricerca probabilmente si è andati ancora più avanti. Per quello che potremo, se qualcuno ci aiuta, cercheremo di seguire questo "cammino". Ci scusiamo se giriamo il materiale in inglese, ma al momento ci risulta impossibile tradurlo; e crediamo che comunque sia meglio così che … lasciarlo nel cassetto.


Varroa Sensitive Hygiene and Mite Reproduction
Last Updated November 18, 2010

The USDA-ARS Baton Rouge Bee Lab has bred bees that hygienically remove mite-infested pupae from capped worker brood. This ability is called varroa sensitive hygiene, and bees expressing high levels of this behavior are called VSH bees. To select for the VSH trait in your bees, also see Selecting for Varroa Sensitive Hygiene

Figure 1. Hygienic removal of a mite infested worker pupa by ***** worker honey bees is an important mechanism of resistance to varroa mites. The removal involves several bees, and results in death of the mite offspring. The mother mite usually survives.

Figure 2 shows uncapped and chewed pupae. Uncapped worker pupae may have a raised rim, resembling drone brood, as seen below the chewed pupa.

VSH is an important mechanism of resistance to varroa mites. The best resistance is found in pure VSH bees. However, hybrid VSH bees (e.g. VSH queens open mated to non-resistant drones) also have significant resistance to varroa mites.
VSH is very similar or the same as hygienic behavior that honey bees use to combat American foulbrood, chalkbrood, and the eggs and larvae of wax moths and small hive beetles. All colonies probably have individuals that perform VSH, and we do not yet understand how our selective breeding has resulted in colonies with greatly improved performance. Hygiene is performed by nest cleaning bees aged 15-18 days old. Removal of a mite-infested pupae begins when an uncapper smells the infested brood and chews a pinhole through the cell cap. Subsequently, removers enlarge the hole and either eat the infested pupa or pull it from the brood cell (Fig. 1).
VSH bees do not respond to all mite-infested pupae with equal intensity (Fig. 3). They are more likely to remove mite-infested pupae that are not pigmented or only lightly pigmented (stages 2–4) than prepupae (stage 1) or more darkly pigmented pupae (stages 5-Cool. Additionally, they are much less hygienic towards mite-infested drone brood than worker brood. Reasons for these trends are unclear.

Fig. 3. Some factors that influence the degree of varroa sensitive hygiene in colonies of bees include age and genetics of worker bees, age and type of brood, and infestation level of mites in capped brood. .


Removal of mite-infested brood is probably triggered by unusual odors that penetrate the cell cap to the outside where hygienic bees patrol the comb surface. We have observed that VSH bees respond vigorously to highly infested brood (e.g. 15–25 mites per 100 capped cells) that is transferred into the colony (Fig. 4). They uncap and remove many mite-infested pupae quickly. They respond with much less intensity to brood with low infestation rates (1–5 mites per 100 capped cells), probably because the chemical signals that trigger removal are less concentrated and harder to detect.

Figure 4. Comparison of mite-infested brood that had been exposed to VSH bees or controls for 24 hours. Uncapped pupae appear as white dots in this photo.

More characteristics of VSH bees

Figure 5. Often infertile mites from VSH colonies will defecate on the host pupa and not just on the cell wall, as seen here.

Figure 6. Sometimes mites from VSH colonies will die in this manner. They are found sandwiched between the cell wall and the cocoon which was spun by the current host bee as it prepared to pupate. We think this suggests that the mite was too weak to awake from the brood food as the last instar larvae finished eating prior to the molt. Perhaps the mite was already dead, or just too weak to escape the placement of the cocoon over it by the spinning larva.

Fig. 7. Pie charts showing the proportion of mites that are reproductive in VSH and control colonies.

Figure 8. Cell caps from normal (upper right) and recapped (lower two) brood cells. The three cell caps have been removed and flipped over.
Selecting for Varroa Sensitive Hygiene
Last Updated November 12, 2010

For a description of the VSH trait in honey bees, please see Varroa Sensitive Hygiene and Mite Reproduction.
The USDA-ARS Baton Rouge Bee Lab has bred bees that express Varroa Sensitive Hygiene, and we would like to offer a simple technique that queen breeders could use to select for VSH. However, there is no method at this time that is both easy and accurate. We have developed several types of measurement, but the most accurate require significant time at a microscope to evaluate colony performance (Fig. 1).

Figure 1. – Types of changes in brood combs that can be measured without and with a stereo-microscope. For example, the percentage of pupae uncapped during a certain period of time could potentially be used to breed for varroa resistance. Uncapped pupae are visible without a microscope, but measuring the % uncapped pupae is highly variable and does not always predict VSH behavior. On the other hand, measuring the percentage of infertile mites (those without progeny) predicts strong varroa resistance, but it requires detailed microscopic examinations of brood to measure.


Figure2. - Measuring mite infertility requires evaluation of mother mites and their families. This is easiest with pupae that are stage 3-5. In this example, a stage 5 pupa is shown. For this stage of bee development, it is normal for a mother to have 4-5 offspring, and her oldest daughter and son are adults.
Select on mite infertility
The most reliable method is to select for a high infertility rate in the mite population (Fig. 2). We are not certain how it happens, but somehow VSH increases mite infertility. Generally, 15-25% of mites in non-resistant colonies do not lay eggs. Infertility increases to 80-100% in colonies with pure VSH queens. Mite populations eventually decline in these colonies because so few mites lay eggs.
In Figure 2, we see the two extremes of mite reproductive success that can be measured using a microscope. The “fertile” mite has produced 4-5 offspring by the time that the host pupa has an evenly tan color on the entire body. The “infertile” mite on the bottom has produced no progeny. There are other possible family structures that one may encounter. For example, there may be a mite that only produces a son and another mite that produces 2-3 offspring but in such a manner that none of the offspring have time to become ...... mites before the bee emerges from the brood cell. Fortunately, it is not necessary to record all of these potential family structures. Our research has shown that just focusing on the percentage of infertile mites (breeding for a higher value) will produce bees with high expression of the VSH trait.
Select on high uncapping of infested combs
The second and quickest method is to monitor changes in capped brood after it is exposed to colonies for short periods (3–40 hours). For example, a highly infested comb was cut into halves, and each half was caged with one type of bee for 24 hours (Fig. 3). VSH bees uncapped > 90 pupae, while controls uncapped only 15 pupae. For both types of bees, about 65-80% of all uncapped pupae were mite-infested. Many of the uncapped pupae were chewed, which suggested eminent removal by the bees. A queen breeder could select for those bees that uncap the most mite-infested pupae in a given period of time.

Figure 3. Comparison of mite-infested brood that had been exposed to VSH bees or controls for 24 hours. Uncapped pupae appear as white dots in this photo. The straight lines of empty cells mark the tract that was sampled to determine the infestation rate (58 mites per 100 capped brood cells) for the comb before it was given to the test bees. See next selection method for explanation.

Select using before and after infestation rates

Figure 4. Changes in the varroa infestation of capped brood after combs are exposed to two types of bees for 1 week. In this experiment, VSH bees removed 57% of mite-infested pupae, while controls removed only 1% of mite-infested pupae.
A third method is to compare the infestation of capped brood before and after a comb is exposed to a colony of bees (Fig. 4). We choose combs that contain prepupae as the predominant stage of brood at the start of the test. After the initial infestation rate is measured, the comb is inserted into the broodnest of a colony for 1 week. The infestation rate is found by examining 200 capped brood cells under a microscope and recording the contents of each infested cell. For example, if 20 mite-infested pupae are detected, the infestation rate would be reported as 10% (20 mite-infested pupae per 200 total pupae that were examined). During the experiment, the bees will gradually mature from prepupae through various pupal stages. The mite families will also grow as each mother mite lays a series of eggs, and each egg hatches to become a nymph that grows through time. We limit the exposure period to 1 week in order to prevent the bees from maturing to the point that they emerge from brood cells before the final infestation rate can be measured.
The infestation of the capped brood is estimated at the beginning and at the end of the test, and the two rates are compared. If no mites are removed from the brood, the two rates will be very similar. Hygienic removal of mite-infested pupae reduces the final infestation rate. Selection would favor colonies with the highest removal of mites in a given period of time.
Principles of Honeybee Genetics

Use this page as a tool for visualizing and understanding some of the various genetic mechanisms at work in honeybees.
Mating behavior - multiple mates make for a complex family.
Chromosome number - key in understanding bee genetics.
Cordovan color- a useful genetic marker, controlled by a recessive gene.
Hygienic behavior two recessive genes for uncapping and removing diseased brood.
Tracheal mite resistance - thought to be controlled by dominant gene(s).
Sex alleles - determines solid or scattered brood pattern.
Mitochondrial DNA - used to trace the maternal lineage of bees.
Oddball bees - a gallery of unusual bees.
Principles of honey bee genetics - adapted from an EAS workshop



Mating behavior


To keep things simple, further examples will show a queen mated to a single drone.
This can be done with instrumental insemination, to sort genetic traits.

Number of chromosomes in bees. A key factor.
Drones result from unfertilized eggs (parthenogenesis).They have no father.
All eggs and sperm carry 16 chromosomes each.
Each egg contains a unique combination of 50% of the queens genes.
All 10 million sperm produced by a drone are identical clones.
Since each queen mates with 10-20 drones, colonies are comprised of subfamilies, each having the same mother but different fathers.
Workers of the same subfamily are related by 75% of their genes.
This "extra" close relatedness may explain the cooperative, and altruistic behaviors found in colonies.
It also explains why workers forego their own reproduction in favor of helping their queen mother raise more sisters. Their sisters are more closely related to them than their own offspring would be. (75% vs 50%)

Cordovan color

Cordovan Italian
Wild type Italian



Hygienic behavior

Recent research suggests that this model of hygienic behavior may be too simplistic. Evidence now shows that there may be as many seven genes involved.

Tracheal mite resistance


Sex alleles


Mitochondrial DNA













Varroa Sensitive Hygiene VSH
The natural way to control mites and brood diseases
"In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity"
Albert Einstein
It's not often in life that an idea comes along that is so good that it can change the world. The development of VSH bees which can reduce Varroa mite populations without chemical treatments is just such an idea. The result of over a decade of research by some of today's brightest honeybee scientists, VSH is making a difference in the apiaries and lives of beekeepers all across America.
The development of the VSH line of bees by the team of scientists at the USDA Bee Breeding Lab in Baton Rouge, is a true scientific success story. Through careful observation and experimentation, they painstakingly came to understand the natural defenses that the bees had hidden away in their genome. Selection for these beneficial genetic traits over many bee generations has resulted in not only resistance to Varroa mites, but also to American Foulbrood and Chalkbrood. The hygienic behavior of VSH bees, even extends to defense against wax moths and small hive beetles.
Queen rearing is one of those high leverage activities, where small actions can have large consequences. By carefully choosing the proper breeding stock to begin with, entire local populations of bees can be transformed into mite destroying armies, getting the upper hand on the many problems Varroa can cause. The development and use of VSH bees show that man and nature can work together for the mutual benefit of both.
Varroa Sensitive Hygiene and Mite Reproduction
Selecting for Varroa Sensitive Hygiene
Questions and answers about VSH
What is VSH?
Sources of naturally mated VSH queens
How to observe the VSH trait for yourself
The Latest VSH Research

Distribution of pure VSH breeder queens 2001-2011

Queen Producers who sell naturally mated VSH queens

View Larger Map and List
Should you be listed on this map? Let us know.
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

7 Stands Bee Farm - Hays,NC, (336) 957-4744 - email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

A-Bee Honey -
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
- 505-286-4843 - New Mexico - Hygienic Italian, VSH Carniolan, VSH, & Cordovan queens, nucs and packages, email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

Big Island Queens - Captain Cook, HI, (808) 328-9249 VSH queens
Broke-T Apiaries - Johnny Thompson - 13340 Hwy 488 Philadelphia, MS 39350 601-656-5701 home 601-562-0701 cell -
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

Bz Bee Pollination - P.O. Box 699, Esparto, CA 95627 (530) 787-3044

Bjorn Apiaries - (717) 938-0444 - Pennsylvania email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

Richard Callahan,Phd - (508) 829-4805 - Holden, MA -
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

Carney Queens and Honey Farm LLC, (434)292-4428 VSH and Hygienic Italian queens and queen cells, pick-up only.
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

Harris Honey Bees - Meadow Vista, CA - (530)368-6293 -VSH queens, nucs, and packages. email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

Hewy's Honey Bee Co. - Douglasville, GA (678) 855-2593 - Open mated VSH queens - email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

Kona Queen Co. - P.O. Box 768, Captain Cook, HI 96704 - (808) 328-9016
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
- VSH, Italian and Carniolan queens from Hawaii
Lamb's Honey Farm - RRT3 Box N. 592, Jasper, TX 75951, (409) 384-6754
Log Cabin Bee Farm - Pa - VSH queens - email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

Long Creek Apiaries - (423) 623-2345 - Tennessee - Russian - VSH - Carniolan - Italian - Queens
Lucas Apiaries - (805) 914-4053 - Southern California - VSH - Hygienic - Russian - Cordovan - Carniolan - Queens and Nucs
Miksa Honey Farms 13404 Honeycomb Road, Groveland, FL 34736, (352) 429-3447 email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
Queen cells - shipped by UPS
Olympic Wilderness Apiary - (866) 204 -3426 toll free - Washington, Queens only June to October
Powell Apiaries - 4140 County Road K K, Orland CA 95963, (530) 865-3346
Ridgetop Apiaries - (931) 858-5280 - Tennessee - VSH queens -
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

Queen Haven - (530) 588-6161- Northern California - Ray and Klarene Olivarez - VSH Italian and Carniolan Queens -email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

VP Queen Bees - 301-662-4844 - Maryland - VSH, Carniolan X VSH, Italian X VSH, Breeders/Virgins/Cells. Email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

WG Bee Farm - Frank & Linda Wyatt - (336) 635-5821 - North Carolina - email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!

Zia Queenbee Co - Mark Spitzig & Melanie Kirby - 505-689-1287 - New Mexico - email
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!


What is VSH?
USDA ARS scientists Dr. John Harbo and Dr. Jeffrey Harris at the Honey Bee Breeding Laboratory in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, have defined and tested a trait of the honeybee which appeared to suppress mite reproduction (SMR). Recently it has been better defined as "varroa sensitive hygiene (VSH)." This is a form of behavior where ***** bees remove pupae that have reproductive mites but do not disturb pupae that have mites that produce no progeny.
Recent research done under real world beekeeping conditions with Alabama beekeepers clearly show the value of VSH bees. The resistance to Varroa mites was significantly better than all other bees in the study without sacrificing honey production. These bees have proven their value to American beekeepers. The time has come for you to take advantage of this remarkable line of bees.
Dr. Harbo and Dr. Harris proved the effectiveness of the VSH trait by exchanging queens between resistant and susceptible colonies. Each time a resistant queen was put into a susceptible colony, the mite population went down. On the other hand, every time a susceptible queen was placed in the resistant colonies, the mite population increased.
Recent studies by Dr. Spivak and Dr. Harbo have shown that the SMR trait might be best described as a "varroa-sensitive hygienic behavior". VSH bees remove mites that have started to reproduce. The reproduction of mites triggers their removal by the bees. The only mites left in the cells are non reproductive or sterile. So there is evidence for selective removal of reproductive mites from brood cells.
A goal of the USDA SMR Project is to distribute the VSH trait for resistance to Varroa mites to queen breeders around the country. The object is to cross these bees with beekeeper's own well adapted stock. This will maintain the genetic diversity of American bees while enhancing this important trait. Once in the hives of beekeepers, further selection and improvement can be made for honey production, other disease resistance mechanisms, and other beneficial traits.
Recent tests have shown that VSH queens retain an acceptable level of mite resistance when they are free mated to unselected drones. The best way to get the maximum amount of the trait into a line of bees is to begin with a pure VSH breeder queen so her daughters mate with your local drones.
The VSH trait has proven to be extremely effective at controlling Varroa. It holds great promise as a permanent solution, but the work is not yet finished. There is still considerable variation in crosses with different lines of bees, and so should still be thought of as as a work in progress. With the recent retirement of Dr. Harbo from the bee lab, Dr. Bob Danka , Dr. Jeffrey Harris and the team at the USDA Baton Rouge Bee Lab are carrying on the work.
Learn more about SMR / VSH
Honey Bees with the Trait of Varroa Sensitive Hygiene Remove Brood with All Reproductive Stages of Varroa Mites
Status of bees with the trait of varroa sensitive hygiene (VSH) for varroa resistance Jan 2009 American Bee Journal
Simplified methods of evaluating colonies for levels of Varroa Sensitive Hygiene (VSH) 2009 Journal of Apicultural Research
Comparative Performance of Two Mite-Resistant Stocks of Honey Bees in Alabama Beekeeping Operations 2008 J. of Economic Entomology
THE VSH TRAIT EXPLAINED BY HYGIENIC BEHAVIOR OF ***** BEES
Cleaning House-and Hive - A special line of bees uses the power of hygiene to fend off its worst foe. - ARS
Special Line of Bees "Sniffs Out" Its Worst Enemy- ARS
SMR-This Honey of a Trait Protects Bees From Deadly Mites - ARS
The Relationship of Between Suppression of Mite Reproduction (SMR) and Hygienic Behavior, Ibrahim, A. and Spivak, M. American Bee Journal, May 2004
The SMR Trait Explained by Hygienic Behavior of ***** Bees - American Bee Journal 145(5)430-431
The Number of Genes Involved in the SMR Trait - American Bee Journal 145(5)430
An Evaluation of Commercially-Produced Queens That Have the SMR Trait - ABJ 143213-216
"Varroa Resistance of Hybrid ARS Russian Honey Bees"-American Bee Journal 144(10)797-800
.Breeding Honey Bees that Suppress Mite Reproduction Natural and Suppressed Reproduction of Varroa, Bee Culture, May 2001
SMR Queens an Update - Bee Culture, May 2002
Further Reference about VSH bees

Questions and Answers

How were VSH bees developed?
Dr. Harbo and Dr. Harris have methodically worked on selecting bees for Varroa resistance since 1995. They first had to develop techniques for measuring populations of bees and mites and for measuring characteristics that are associated with resistance. Then they identified specific traits that are related to the growth of mite populations. These traits were analyzed statistically to determine the degree of heritability they had. The trait for suppressed mite reproduction SMR, now called VSH, was shown to be the most promising, so they began a selective breeding program to enhance it. Read about the VSH Project at the USDA ARS Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics & Physiology Laboratory website
.Where did VSH bees come from?
VSH bees were originally selected from diverse domestic honeybee colonies in Louisiana and Michigan that showed some degree of mite resistance . They are all American bees.
What's special about these bees?
Recent studies by Dr. Spivak and Dr. Harbo have shown that the VSH trait might be best described as a "varroa sensitive hygienic behavior". VSH bees remove mites that have started to reproduce. The reproduction of mites triggers their removal by the bees. The only mites left in the cells are non reproductive or sterile. So there is evidence that bees with the VSH trait selectively remove reproductive mites from brood cells.
Are VSH bees related to the USDA Russian bees?
No. Though coming out of the same USDA ARS research laboratory as the Russians, they are not related. VSH bees are not imported, they originated from domestic American colonies.
What is the VSH project?
A goal of the USDA ARS VSH Project is to distribute this mite resistance trait to queen breeders around the country. The object is to cross these bees with beekeeper's own well adapted stock, thus maintaining the genetic diversity of American bees while introducing this important trait. Once in the hives of beekeepers, further selection and improvement can be made for honey production, other disease resistance mechanisms, and other traits.
Are the genes for suppressed mite reproduction dominant or recessive?
The VSH trait is thought to be controlled by more than one gene, just how many is uncertain at this point. These genes are neither dominant nor recessive. They are what is called "additive" which simply means that the more of them that are present, the more strongly the trait will be expressed. This works in favor of beekeepers since a queen with VSH genes can mate to any drones and still have the trait expressed in her colony enough to reduce the mite population. So naturally mated queens produced from pure VSH breeders are mite resistant.
Who should buy pure VSH breeder queens?
Pure VSH breeder queens should be used for queen rearing purposes. The best way to get the maximum amount of the trait into a line of bees is to begin with a pure VSH breeder queen so her daughters mate with your local drones. Daughter queens of pure VSH breeders who are out crossed by natural mating have good brood production and an acceptable level of mite resistance. The naturally mated daughters of these breeder queens should be used for production hives. Naturally mated queens containing 50% of the VSH trait can be purchased from various queen producers.
How do you know VSH bees are mite resistant?
In a recent published study Dr. Harris and Dr. Harbo proved the effectiveness of the VSH trait by exchanging queens between resistant and susceptible colonies. Each time a resistant queen was put into a susceptible colony, the mite population went down. On the other hand, every time a susceptible queen was placed in the resistant colonies, the mite population increased.In another study by Dr. Marla Spivak at the University of Minnesota, bees of several strains were compared. The VSH colonies showed the highest degree of mite resistance, and also had good honey production.
What is the difference between VSH and SMR bees?
This line was originally called SMR for Suppressed Mite Reproduction because that was the apparent cause of the resistance to varroa mites. However after further research, it was learned that the real cause was a type of hygienic behavior that was sensitive to the presence of reproductive varroa mites. With this clarification of the mode of resistance, SMR was renamed VSH for Varroa Sensitive Hygiene to be more accurate.bee Further reading on VSH bees

Observing the VSH trait
If there is one good thing about varroa mites, it is that they are large enough to see fairly easily. With a magnifying glass, a flashlight, and a little time to look, the VSH trait can be observed in any stock of bees. The USDA maintains a web site on Varroa mite reproduction which has an excellent display of pictures and descriptions of mites, both reproductive and non-reproductive. Your time will be well repaid by studying this site before you begin your own observations.
Materials needed
2x-4x Magnification - visor magnifying glass works well or low power stereo microscope is best.
Lighting - a bright handheld penlight
Forceps or tweezers- fine enough to uncap and pull out pupae
Record sheet - a simple tally of reproductive and non-reproductive mites.
Brood comb containing mites - from colonies not recently treated with miticides.
Time to look- allow at least an hour per comb
What to look for
1. Uncap purple eyed pupae with tan body color.
2. Remove and inspect pupae for white fecal deposit- bright white powder.
3. Check pupae for varroa mites. They may colored brown or white depending on age.
4. Check cell wall for white fecal deposit, usually on the upper cell wall.
5. Check cell interior for mites.
6. Identify the reddish brown mother mite.
7. Identify lighter or smaller offspring mites.
8. Inspect 20 infested cells containing a single mother mite.
9. Record number of reproducing and non-reproducing mites.
10. Compare colonies to select the best breeders.



…………………………………………………………………………………………..
Riceve questa mail perché nella mailing list dell'A.I.A.A.R.
Nel caso non desideri le nostre comunicazioni, ce lo comunichi.
Nel caso possa segnalarci altri contatti interessati, la segnalazione è gradita.
Nel caso voglia far girare questa mail a chi ritiene interessato, la ringraziamo.

Presidente Gabriele Milli
Fr Rofelle 62 - 52032 Badia Tedalda AR
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
cell. 338705438
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email
pxp






Sesso: Sesso:Maschio

Registrato: 09/10/13 21:28
Messaggi: 31
pxp is offline 

Località: Colline Moreniche del Garda, Lombardia
Interessi: tecnologia,fotografia,trekking
Impiego: imprenditore agricolo



italy
MessaggioInviato: Dom Ott 20, 2013 8:28 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

Quest'anno non sono riuscito a mettere in pratica il test VHS ma mi prometto di provare il prossimo anno nel mio allevamento. Mi sento convinto chè è importante provare.
Questo argomento lo stavo leggendo da qualche mese e non ho idea se in Italia esista qualche allevatore di regine che abbia messo in pratica l'esperienza.
Non mi sembra ma puo' darsi che mi sbagli. I link sopracitati li conosco tutti e ne potrei aggiungere altri anche se non vedo l'utilità pratica di linkare decine di indirizzi quando chiunque potrebbe trovarseli da soli usando gli strumenti del mestiere a disposizione (vedi tag; esempio prova con Varroa Sensitive Hygiene VSH Breeder Queens) Escono 334 pagine !
La mia impressione è che in USA la specializzazione VHS nell'allevamento delle regine sia avanti anni luce rispetto a noi. Mi sbaglio? Seguo anche i forum di apicoltura sostenibile (sustainable beekeeping) e anche loro adottano, con delle varianti, questa metodologia sulla lotta alla varroa. Le strade tra convenzionale e biologico su questo tema in USA sembrano convergere perchè si è capito che con la chimica, come in agricoltura, l'uomo non risolve i problemi ma ne crea di nuovi. Meglio quindi la via della genetica come risorsa naturale per la sopravvivenza della specie?
Comunque se ci sono altre persone interessante all'argomento, scusate per la terribile discriminante della lingua inglese ma è un must iimprescindibile, potremmo fondare un gruppo di studio.
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato
Sbloccato: Mar Ott 22, 2013 1:11 pm da raffo
sirio






Sesso: Sesso:Maschio
Età: 46
Registrato: 28/04/11 13:53
Messaggi: 3488
sirio is offline 

Località: alfianello BS
Interessi: oltre alle api la norcineria, la subaquea il buon cibo il buon bere e molto altro
Impiego: Apicoltore a tempo pieno



italy
MessaggioInviato: Mer Ott 23, 2013 8:09 am    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

allora in parole povere di cosa si tratta?, di controllare favo per favo con la lente di ingrandimento e vedere quale famiglia, lascia varroe sterili, in cella e elimina le varroe prolifiche, e come lo si capisce? se le api disopercolano la cella con dentro 2 varroe?, una spiegazione in parole povvere in lingua madre sarebbe molto gradita, anche da chi l'inglese lo mastica a fatica, grazie Smile
_________________
Cristiano Lancini

P.S. per qualsiasi commento del mio diario 2013
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email
iezzi






Sesso: Sesso:Maschio
Età: 50
Registrato: 28/08/12 12:28
Messaggi: 407
iezzi is offline 

Località: Roma


Sito web: http://www.apicolturai...


italy
MessaggioInviato: Lun Feb 03, 2014 12:35 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

Fino ad ora la mia esperienza con il 4,9 è positiva. Per questa stagione non ho colonie 4,9 da vendere, probabilmente la prossima ce ne saranno un po'. Per maggiori info sul 4,9 potete seguirmi sul mio
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
.
_________________
Per consigli o domande sulle mie attività apistiche postate
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage
apibio








Registrato: 16/01/10 14:17
Messaggi: 487
apibio is offline 

Località: Verona
Interessi: Apicoltura

Sito web: http://www.apibio.it


NULL
MessaggioInviato: Lun Mar 31, 2014 6:17 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

iezzi ha scritto:
Fino ad ora la mia esperienza con il 4,9 è positiva. Per questa stagione non ho colonie 4,9 da vendere, probabilmente la prossima ce ne saranno un po'. Per maggiori info sul 4,9 potete seguirmi sul mio
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
.


detto così è un po poco.......... vogliamo sapere di più!!!!! :p;

io ho appena riportato l'andamento:


Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage
iezzi






Sesso: Sesso:Maschio
Età: 50
Registrato: 28/08/12 12:28
Messaggi: 407
iezzi is offline 

Località: Roma


Sito web: http://www.apicolturai...


italy
MessaggioInviato: Lun Mar 31, 2014 9:55 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

Ciao Apibio,

le cose vanno più o meno come hai detto tu. Il 3 febbraio tutto sembrava ok, il problema l'ho visto alla ripartenza, le api giovani erano debilitate dalla Varroa e sono praticamente collassate.

Al di-là dei numeri e delle percentuali il 4,9 e i distanziatori da 11/12 da soli no bastano ma ti aiutano a fare selezione.

Ironia del caso la colonia che ha superato meglio l'inverno è su 5,3.

Con questo invernamento ho avuto modo di costatare alcune cose.

1) Se il ceppo è poco resistente le colonie su 5,3 schiantano a gennaio e quelle su 4,9 a febbraio Smile

2) Se sono mediamente resistenti le colonie su 5,3 schiantano a febbraio e quelle su 4,9 durano un po di più ma collassano nella ripresa e non vanno in produzione sull'acacia e immagino collassino a ripetizione quando la colonia diventa grande.

3) quelle resistenti sopravvivono sia su 5,3 che su 4,9 e vanno in produzione sull'acacia.

In conclusione se non tratti con il 5,3 ti resta veramente solo il 10% delle colonie mentre con il 4,9 stiamo sotto il 50%.

Ora vediamo cosa succede rifacendo le regine con le madri che hanno superato bene l'inverno.

_________________
Per consigli o domande sulle mie attività apistiche postate
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage
apibio








Registrato: 16/01/10 14:17
Messaggi: 487
apibio is offline 

Località: Verona
Interessi: Apicoltura

Sito web: http://www.apibio.it


NULL
MessaggioInviato: Lun Mar 31, 2014 10:48 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

Ciao Iezzi!!!!

ora con un pupo piccolo il tempo è sempre poco......

posso confermare quanto tu dici: le famiglie normali schiattano molto facilmente!!! quasi tutte!!!! sono veramente poche quelle che passano un inverno senza aver fatto nessun trattamento.

con il 4,9mm si salvano un circa un 50% ma con buone oscillazioni a seconda dell'anno in meglio o peggio.....

quest'anno è andata bene..... ne sono sopravvissute circa il 75%

Famiglie eccezionali hanno fatto anche 3 anni!!! senza trattamenti!!!

il problema, a mio avviso, è che il singolo può fare poco: mezzi, risorse, e competenze limitate...... ma penso che se si riuscisse a fare un gruppo di lavoro congiunto si potrebbero ottenere migliori risultati.

mi spiego: se io ho una regina che è campata 3 anni senza trattamenti e da quella ci faccio una decina di regine per uso personale.... si ottiene poco.....

ma se io seleziono e ho una regina che da 3 anni vive senza trattamenti.... la do ad un altro membro del forum che è in grado di farci 100-200 regine.......poi c'è chi aiuta con l'inseminazione artificiale....... le regine vanno ad altri utenti che le testano..... le migliori ritornano a chi verifica la resistenza alla varroa o a chi fa regine...... ecco che le cose cambiano!!!

diciamo un gruppo di lavoro.....dove ci si divide i compiti.......con un protocollo da seguire..... ma nulla di complicato..... cosa ne pensi???
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage
iezzi






Sesso: Sesso:Maschio
Età: 50
Registrato: 28/08/12 12:28
Messaggi: 407
iezzi is offline 

Località: Roma


Sito web: http://www.apicolturai...


italy
MessaggioInviato: Mar Apr 01, 2014 12:42 am    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

Non credo che sia difficile da fare.

Ad un selezionatore bastano 120 colonie, ogni madre viene valutata in base al comportamento delle sue 10 figlie. Una madre supera l'inverno senza trattamenti, si fanno 10 figlie e se una buona parte di loro supera l'inverno il secondo anno la madre sara scelta come allevatrice. Le migliori delle 10 figlie saranno a loro volta valutate con altre 10 figlie e così via.

A dare le 10 figlie non credo ci siano problemi chi le vuole le compra, il problema sta nel valutare le figlie e riprendere le madri, qualcuno potrebbe volutamente scambiarle o non restituirle.

_________________
Per consigli o domande sulle mie attività apistiche postate
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage
apibio








Registrato: 16/01/10 14:17
Messaggi: 487
apibio is offline 

Località: Verona
Interessi: Apicoltura

Sito web: http://www.apibio.it


NULL
MessaggioInviato: Mar Apr 01, 2014 6:10 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

iezzi ha scritto:
il problema sta nel valutare le figlie e riprendere le madri, qualcuno potrebbe volutamente scambiarle o non restituirle.


certamente il tutto funzionerebbe solo se chi se ne occupa non sabota la cosa e si comporta onestamente...... ma questo in tutte le cose!
poi con un regolamento semplice, chiaro e conveniente da entrambe le parti.... si potrebbe evitare che ci si "il furbo della situazione".

Mi spiego: se ad esempio ho una regina che è campata 3 anni senza trattamenti la cederò a chi si occuperà di fare le regine...... e questo in cambio mi invierà un tot di sue figlie.

io sono contento perché ho ricevuto delle regine giovani, lui è contento perché da quella regina ne farà e ne venderà molte.... senza aver perso alveari per testare la resistenza...... basta creare una collaborazione che sia utile ad entrambi.... cosi uno non si sogna di fare il furbo!!!

Sarebbe un gruppo aperto a tutti..... ma con persone fidate nei ruoli chiave.

Non penso sarebbe cosi difficile da organizzare......
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage
Fabrizio






Sesso: Sesso:Maschio
Età: 52
Registrato: 29/10/08 07:52
Messaggi: 1008
Fabrizio is offline 

Località: Dronero (CN) mt.622 slm.


Sito web: http://www.fabriziofio...


italy
MessaggioInviato: Mar Apr 01, 2014 6:38 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

ciao Apibio

200/300 regine da distribuire ( senza ritorno economico ) a dei testatori per me è impossibile , date le mie modeste dimensioni aziendali .

Però con l'inseminazione strumentale qualcosa lo si può fare . E se non lo faccio io ( dato che credo di essermi preso impegni che vanno ben oltre le mie per ora modeste capacità ) , sicuramente qualcuno che insemini lo troviamo ( comunque la passione è tanta e se tutto fila come deve , il tempo lo trovo di sicuro ) . Dammi solo un attimo per confrontarmi con gli altri amici e vediamo che si può fare .

Noi non abbiamo nessun regolamento . Semplicemente , a forza di sentirci , siamo diventati molto Amici . E ci fidiamo l'uno dell'altro . Già ci siamo scambiati regine , non VSH ma con tratti igienici .
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage Skype
apibio








Registrato: 16/01/10 14:17
Messaggi: 487
apibio is offline 

Località: Verona
Interessi: Apicoltura

Sito web: http://www.apibio.it


NULL
MessaggioInviato: Mar Apr 01, 2014 7:42 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

Ciao Fabrizio!!!!

Fabrizio ha scritto:
200/300 regine da distribuire ( senza ritorno economico ) a dei testatori per me è impossibile , date le mie modeste dimensioni aziendali .


non solo è impossibile....... a te...... ma pure a babbo natale!!!! ahahah ahahah ahahah

non ho mai pensato di distribuire centinaia di regine gratuitamente!!!!

io ad esempio ti cedo una mia regina che è vissuta un po di anni senza trattamenti.... io non sono un allevatore di regine e ne potrei fare solo poche per uso personale....... il che sarebbe un peccato

tu mi ricambi con un po di sue figlie.... io non le tratto e vado avanti per vedere quelle che resistono di più....... e ti invierò le migliori sempre in cambio di alcune figlie....

Dalla mia regina tu ci fai tutte le regine che vuoi e le vendi a chi ti pare.......a chi te le chiede selezionate particolarmente per questo aspetto.......

Ora tra quelli a cui le vendi ci può essere chi ha voglia di partecipare al progetto di selezione..verificarne la resistenza alla varroa..... di confrontarle con le altre in apiario.......anche semplicemente dando un riscontro, o magari restituendoti la regina vecchia per una-alcune giovani.

un sistema basato sulla collaborazione senza gravare su nessuno, dove ognuno da una parte da dall'altra riceve.
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage
iezzi






Sesso: Sesso:Maschio
Età: 50
Registrato: 28/08/12 12:28
Messaggi: 407
iezzi is offline 

Località: Roma


Sito web: http://www.apicolturai...


italy
MessaggioInviato: Mer Apr 02, 2014 12:30 am    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

Non ho colto al volo questa aspetto però per me si può fare.

Nel senso che io ti mando 10 figlie, tu non le tratti, le inverni, fai alcuni test la prossima primavera e dopo l'acacia mi rimandi le migliori.

Così a volo i test da fare sono semplici:

1) Ripresa primaverile: ad una certa data si stimano api e covata

2) Sciamatura: si contano il numero di celle prodotte durante il periodo di sciamatura

3) Raccolto: quanta acacia raccolgono.

Non ci resta che fare l'elenco delle persone disposte a non trattare un certo numero di colonie.

_________________
Per consigli o domande sulle mie attività apistiche postate
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage
giancarlo50






Sesso: Sesso:Maschio

Registrato: 14/09/12 12:35
Messaggi: 304
giancarlo50 is offline 

Località: Teramo
Interessi: Apicoltura




italy
MessaggioInviato: Mer Apr 02, 2014 8:18 am    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

Iezzi, anche tu hai famiglie che da anni non tratti e sono sopravvissute alla varroa?
Per quanto riguarda la collaborazione che ritengo ottima tra apicoltori e allevatori selezionatori, spero che ci sia una continuazione prolungata nel tempo, solo che a me sembra che Apibio si sia espresso meglio, un allevatore ha bisogno di testare le regine e quindi per questo lavoro ha bisogno della collaborazione degli apicoltori, se poi tu intendi che Fabrizio ti debba offrire il servizio della riproduzione con la tecnica dell’I.S. allora questo diventa una cosa a pagamento.
Per i controlli dei valori da te suggerito, sicuramente vanno fatti, ma forse al momento il soggetto principale è:
La sopravvivenza delle famiglie alla varroa e ai virus con zero chimica,
dico questo perché prima bisogna consolidare quel carattere con l’IS e poi gli altri che vengono dopo ai fini produttivi.
Un saluto Giancarlo50
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato
apibio








Registrato: 16/01/10 14:17
Messaggi: 487
apibio is offline 

Località: Verona
Interessi: Apicoltura

Sito web: http://www.apibio.it


NULL
MessaggioInviato: Mer Apr 02, 2014 12:01 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

Ciao Giancarlo

penso che sarebbe auspicabile che al progetto partecipasse anche chi si dedica all'IS..... e non per denaro!!!!

Immagina che tu e un produttore di regine riceviate da me, da iezzi, e da altri apicoltori una serie di regine che hanno passato 2-3 inverni senza alcun trattamento...... tu in accordo con chi produce le regine fai l'inseminazione strumentale che serve........ chi fa regine ne invierà un po' a chi ha fatto la selezione iniziale cosi continua il lavoro e alcune a chi ha fatto l'inseminazione strumentale...... e poi ne venderà un buon numero ( si spera ) a vari apicoltori in modo da avere un riscontro..... come hai detto tu sarebbe una selezione per la sopravvivenza delle famiglie alla varroa e ai virus.

ognuno potrebbe avvalersi del lavoro degli altri..... e si potrebbero ottenere, forse, risultati migliori.....
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage
iezzi






Sesso: Sesso:Maschio
Età: 50
Registrato: 28/08/12 12:28
Messaggi: 407
iezzi is offline 

Località: Roma


Sito web: http://www.apicolturai...


italy
MessaggioInviato: Mer Apr 02, 2014 7:01 pm    Oggetto:  
Descrizione:
Rispondi citando

@Ginacarlo50 non tratto da un paio di anni ma le madri che mi hanno dato risultati migliori sono rosse.

Da quello che ho visto quest'anno, già la ripresa primaverile può essere sufficiente, ma visto che basta aspettare un mesetto e si valuta anche sciamatura e primo raccolto secondo me vale la pena fare una selezione multipla. Tanto se non tratti o muoiono o collassano e non fanno raccolto.

Personalmente ho intenzione di selezionare un'ape tollerante alla Varroa, voglio usare l'inseminazione strumentale ma non ho 100 colonie da non trattare per il prossimo anno.

Se qualcuno è disposto a mettere in gioco 10 colonie per questo progetto io sono disposto ad offrirgli 10 regine figlie delle mie madri non trattate.

Per le modalità di incrocio e valutazione se ne può parlare e condivide re pubblicamente.

_________________
Per consigli o domande sulle mie attività apistiche postate
Solo gli utenti registrati possono vedere i link!
Registrati o Entra nel forum!
Torna in cima
Profilo Messaggio privato Invia email HomePage
Mostra prima i messaggi di:   
Nuovo Topic   Rispondi    Indice del forum -> Avversità delle api Tutti i fusi orari sono GMT + 1 ora
Vai a pagina Precedente  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Successivo
Pagina 3 di 6

 
Vai a:  
Non puoi inserire nuovi Topic in questo forum
Non puoi rispondere ai Topic in questo forum
Non puoi modificare i tuoi messaggi in questo forum
Non puoi cancellare i tuoi messaggi in questo forum
Non puoi votare nei sondaggi in questo forum
Non puoi allegare files in questo forum
Puoi scaricare files da questo forum


Indice del forum


apicoltura topic RSS feed 
Powered by MasterTopForum.com with phpBB © 2003 - 2008